Addictions in economically developed societies

While drug use and other such addictions are a problem that affects every nation, the challenges that face developed nations can be quite different to developing nations. People in developed nations can face considerable amounts of stress due to a fast paced life. Quite often this leads them to have alcohol binges, cigarette smoking, self-medicate with drugs or indulge in other activities that could lead to addictive behaviour. Along with this, higher disposable incomes in developed countries make it easy for people to acquire addictive substances or things. Drug use and addiction is one of the most pressing problems facing developed countries today.

Whenever there is a relatively high environment of overindulgence in materialistic pleasures as seen in developed countries, ghosts (demons, devils, negative energies, etc.) are able to merge with the person who is addicted in a very short time and fulfil their own cravings.

Due to such an environment, as there is intense awareness of thoughts of addictions, some women develop or continue addictions like cigarette smoking, alcoholism even during pregnancy. Thus the ghost (demon, devil, negative energies, etc.) present in the embryonic state, along with fulfilling its craving during the pregnancy itself, also keeps total control on the mother as well as on the embryo and enjoys the fulfilment of its craving throughout their lives. On the other hand most women overcome this due to their higher level of will power during pregnancy.

This willpower in pregnant women is reflected in a report by samhsa.gov. Looking at combined 2004-2005 data in the US, rates of past month cigarette smoking were lower for pregnant women than non-pregnant women among those aged 26 to 44 (10.4 vs. 28.8 percent) and among those aged 18 to 25 (26.4 vs. 35.8 percent) (Figure 4.5). However, among those aged 15 to 17, the rate of cigarette smoking for pregnant women was higher than for non-pregnant women (22.3 vs. 18.5 percent), although the difference was not significant. (Ref: Samsha.gov 2005)

Smoking statistics - addictions spiritual cause and treatment

When women continue indulging their addictions to cigarette smoking, drinking alcohol or drugs during pregnancy it is more likely to affect their babies at a physical, psychological and spiritual level.

This is one of the reasons why we come across many small children in affluent societies displaying addictive behaviour such as smoking cigarettes or being trapped in sexual desire at a very young age. This too is primarily caused by ghosts or negative energies. Robbed of a normal adolescence, these types of individuals are at risk of becoming mentally imbalanced or psychiatric patients later on in life. Ghosts (demons, devils, negative energies, etc.) manifest naturally through the gross body of such patients and destroy the harmony in many homes.

A report by samsha.gov shows high usage patterns of cigarette smoking in the US starting from as young as 12 years old.

Statistics cigarette smoking - spiritual causes and treatment of addiction

SSRF Comment: Affluent societies are prone to getting distracted by their wealth and the many leisure activities at their disposal. This often leads them to be more self-centred, seeking gratification of their five senses, mind and intellect. Such an attitude leads to addictions for various things which include watching television, excessive food consumption, gambling and substance abuse.

The actual purpose of life is to do all our activities in such a way that it leads to spiritual growth. Thus by getting stuck in the mere gratification of ones five senses, mind and intellect, one is unable to go beyond them which is essential for spiritual growth. More importantly continued focus on materialistic pleasures increases one’s risk of attracting demonic entities that use the person to experience their own (i.e. the entity’s) desires.

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